History of Poudre High School

History of the Building | The River Wall | Our Mascot: The Impala | Fight Song  | Senior Class Gifts | The Mural 

History of the Building

Following the district's re-organization in 1960, the Board of Education hired Dr. O.L. Troxel as a consultant to study population trends and facilities and make a recommendation to the Board of Education.

As a result of this study, he recommended to the Board the Construction of a new high school. Reasons stated in the proposal were the need to reduce the serious overcrowding at Fort Collins High School, and extend the educational opportunities available to high school students in the district.

These recommendations were examined by both the Citizen's Committee for the Public Schools and the Board of Education. The Board proposed a bond issue to include funds for building the new high school which was passed on December 12, 1961.

Mr. Alfred Watts Grant of Denver was selected as the architect. One year after the bond passed educational specifications for the new school were planned and the general contract was awarded to the Weaver Construction Co. of Denver. Wray Plumbing and Heating Co. of Fort Collins was awarded the mechanical contract at that time.

The cornerstone of PHS was laid June 1, 1963 by the Grand Lodge Colorado, A.F. and A.M. The original building was 142,000 square feet, had 43 teaching stations and housed 1150 students from Fort Collins, Waverly, Wellington and LaPorte. Over the years the building increased in size to 170,000 square feet after several additions. 1965 saw the first class graduate from PHS.

In 1993, a bond was submitted again to the citizens of Fort Collins, with provisions for the remodeling of Rocky Mountain High School and Poudre High School, and the building of a new Fort Collins High. The citizens passed this bond and construction on Poudre began in 1994.

The new Poudre High School was completed in 1995 at a total cost of $14.1 million by Baldwin Construction. The Architects were Robb, Brenner & Brelig of Fort Collins. The finished building consists of 275,000 square feet with 6 new additions and 157,000 square feet of space (or 90%) remodeled. Student capacity is 1,800 with a current enrollment of approximately 1,900 students.

Additions to the new building include: ten large science rooms, a state of the art Media Center, 14,000 sq. ft. gymnasium seating 2,000, enlarged Student Commons area, 31 classrooms, 4 networked computer labs, a Mind Center, 6 Pathway resource rooms, Administration/Counseling offices, a 100 seat mini-auditorium Events Center, 500 more parking spaces, 7 acres of intramural athletic fields, expanded training room facilities and equipment, the latest computer technology resources throughout the building, enlarged journalism and darkroom facilities, an outdoor courtyard, expanded Music and Visual Arts departments, additional varsity locker rooms, an enhanced TV productions studio, an International Baccalaureate Center and a unique bronze "River Wall" sculpture. The Dedication Ceremony was February 8, 1996.

(back to top)


The River Wall

" Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it."           - Norman Maclean

To celebrate Poudre High School's 30th anniversary and to commemorate our new building four alumni artists created the River Wall sculture:

Bruce Gueswel, class of 1980, professional artist, sculptor

Barbara (Lillyblade) Breen, class of 1969, prodessional art educator and painter

Christine (Lillyblade) Martell, class of 1967, professional artist and printmaker

Jerry Hubka, class of 1966, professional art educator, potter and painter

The 22 bronze plaques are the artists' symbolic representation of the Poudre River and the turbulent, complex temperament of the waters. The River Wall was created by four alumni artists for the expansion and remodel of Poudre High School in 1994-1995. It commemorates the "new building" and celebrates the 30th anniversary of Poudre High School.

The River Wall sculpture was created to represent and honor our namesake, the wild and scenic Cache la Poudre. The Poudre River originates at the Continental Divide between Grand Lake and trail Ridge, and eventually joins the South Platte River east of Fort Collins.

In the 19th century, French trappers of this region would store their gun powder in secret caves on the banks of this wild river to keep it safe and dry. Cache la Poudre is French for "hide the powder."

The quote, "Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it," from the book by Norman Maclean, was chosen to accompany the sculpture because of the symbolic reference to our namesake river and its meaningful significance to education as an ever flowing pathway of change and lifelong learning. For just as the river and seasons change, so does the pathway of lifelong learning. The bronze quote was a gift from the graduation class of 1994.

(back to top)


Our Mascot, the Impala

Poudre High School is the only high school in the United States with the impala as their mascot. Below you will find some general information about this amazing animal.

Characteristics: Impalas have a short, glossy reddish-tan coat. The undersides are white with rings around the eyes. Other markings include black ear tips, a black stripe down the back and tail, and one stipe down each flank. The "S" shaped horns are only found on the males. There are also black tufts of hair covering a gland on the heel of the back feet.

Habitat: The impala lives mostly along the wooded savannahs in eastern Africa. Their diet consists of grass shoots, leaves, blossoms, and fruit. The impala falls prey to many African predators, but the young are especially vulnerable to pythons.

Behavior: Impalas are active throughout the day, alternating sleeping and grazing. The home range of a herd ranges from 2 to 6 square kilometers. The leaps of impalas may be one of their most famous behaviors; one jump may span over 9 meters in length and 2.5 meters high. The herd will "explode" by jumping in random directions to confuse a predator. However, they are not exceptional runners and will often depend on hiding in cover to escape.

Name Origins: Impala is a Zulu name. The scientific name, aepyceros melampus, comes from Greek words. Aipos means high, keras means the horn of an animal, melas means black, and pous means foot.

(back to top)


Poudre's Fight Song

Poudre High will hit the line like thunder,

And we'll all shout for you to win.

Poudre High will plow the foe right under,

Never, never to give in.

Silver, blue our colors shining brightly,

Guard them all well throughout the game.

Heads up, drive on until we've won,

And then they'll know the victor's name.
 

(back to top)


Senior Class Gifts

When you reach the point in your life when you are ready to leave high school it is only appropriate that you leave a lasting mark on the school. Here at Poudre High School it is a tradition that has been going for over many years. Every year the fleeing senior class chooses a gift to leave
for the school to remember them by, whether it be a painting, sculpture or other creative piece.

Click on a year to see and read about the Senior Class Gift for that year. We are in the process of researching the other years. If you have any information about these years, please contact us by e-mailing us at rlang@psdschools.org.

Choose A Year:
2004   2003   2002   2001   2000   1998   1995   1994   1993   1992   1985   1981   1980

 

2003

The Senior Class Council began planning their gift to Poudre in the fall of 2002! Meetings were held bi-monthly on Tuesdays. The council met with Ms. Lundt, the principal, to gather information about possible ideas for the 2003 gift and to learn of gifts presented in the past. There was also a meeting held held with the Senior Class Council od 2002. The class of 2002 presented a sculpted impala for the courtyard and envisioned future classes continuing to add improvements to the courtyard.

Through fund-raising efforts and generous donations of several people, the Class of 2003 presented stone tables and benches for the courtyard! There is a bronze inlay in the middle of the tables with the 2003 class motto: "Act as if what you do makes a difference. It does."

Senior Jacob Pierson's father, Lindsay Pierson, was very generous in his donation of three round concrete slabs for the foundation of the tables and benches. Mr. Pierson donated materials and labor for the project. One Saturday students and crew cut sod and prepared the ground for the concrete. T-shirts for the event were donated by Katie Troxell's parents and were printed with: "I Moved the Mud." The following Saturday students helped the crew pour the slabs. The stone furniture was purchased from Carlos Amato, Denver, with a considerable discount.

Dedication of the 2003 Senior Class Gift was held Tuesday, May 20, 2003 in the courtyard at Poudre High School.

Senior Class Council members included: Katie Troxell, Heather Johnson, and Morgan Taylor. Faculty Advisors included: Shawn Niedenzu, Mike Zenther, Rich Hayek, and Marcie Lewis.

back to top

 

2002

This year's Senior Class Gift was the fountain and pond installed in the courtyard in the middle of the school.

back to top

 

2001

This year's Senior Class Gift was a clock in the front hall. Below the clock are the metal letters PHS with the names of the students who graduated this year.

back to top

 

2000

This year's Senior Class Gift was a stained glass piece of an impala above the main entrance.

back to top

 

1998

This year's Senior Class Gift was a stepping stone in the front of the school. The quote by Henry Ford reads: "Coming together is a beginning; keeping together is progress; working together is success."

back to top


1995

This year's Senior Class Gift was what we call the River Wall. To celebrate Poudre High School's 30th anniversary and to commemorate or new building, four alumni artists created the River Wall sculpture:

Bruce Gueswel, class of 1980, professional artist, sculptor

Barbara (Lillyblade) Breen, class of 1969, prodessional art educator and painter

Christine (Lillyblade) Martell, class of 1967, professional artist and printmaker

Jerry Hubka, class of 1966, professional art educator, potter and painter

The 22 bronze plaques are the artists' symbolic representation of the Poudre River and the turbulent, complex temperament of the waters. The River Wall was created by four alumni artists for the expansion and remodel of Poudre High School in 1994-1995. It commemorates the "new building" and celebrates the 30th anniversary of Poudre High School.

The River Wall sculpture was created to represent and honor our namesake, the wild and scenic Cache la Poudre. The Poudre River originates at the Continental Divide between Grand Lake and trail Ridge, and eventually joins the South Platte River east of Fort Collins.

In the 19th century, French trappers of this region would store their gun powder in secret caves on the banks of this wild river to keep it safe and dry. Cache la Poudre is French for "hide the powder."

The quote, "Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it," from the book by Norman Maclean, was chosen to accompany the sculpture because of the symbolic reference to our namesake river and its meaningful significance to education as an ever flowing pathway of change and lifelong learning. For just as the river and seasons change, so does the pathway of lifelong learning. The bronze quote was a gift from the graduation class of 1994.

1994

A bronze plaque of the quote, "Eventually, all things merge into one, and a river runs through it," from the book by Norman Maclean, was a gift from the class of 1994.  It was chosen to accompany the River Wall sculpture, the gift from the class of 1995, because of the symbolic reference to our namesake river and its meaningful significance to education as an ever flowing pathway of change and lifelong learning. For just as the river and seasons change, so does the pathway of lifelong learning.

back to top